headshot of candidate

Paul Toner

He/Him

Currently
Executive Director of Teach Plus; Education Consultant

More about Paul Toner

A longtime cambridge resident, Paul Toner lives in the home of his great-grandfather. He is a graduate of Cambridge's Matignon High School, as well as BU, UMass Boston, and Suffolk university.

Paul Toner has not run for City Council before. He was vice president and then president of the Massachusetts Teachers Association from 2006 until 2014, and was president of the Cambridge Teachers Association from 2001-2006. Prior to being in leadership, he was a 7th and 8th grade teacher from 1993 to 2001 at the Harrington Elementary School in Cambridge.

Currently, he is an Executive Director at Teach Plus, a non-profit focused on training teachers to lead to education policy and a supporter of teacher and student evaluation systems. He is also an education consultant and a member of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education.

Incumbent
No
Education
Boston University BA in Political Science; Umass Boston Masters of Education; Suffolk University JD
Age
53 years, 9 months
Born in 1966
Voter Registration
Aug. 18, 1984

Where does Paul live?

Address
Owns at 24 Newman Street Cambridge, MA 02140
Valued at approx. $815,000
Last sold Nov. 10, 1997 for $300,000
inflation adjusted approx. $458,487

Endorsements

Q&A

Interviews with the candidate

Quotes

My top priority is bringing civil discourse back to local government.

Paul Toner, Scout Cambridge Profile

How much housing can we and do we want to tolerate...

Paul Toner, MCNA City Council Candidates Night 2017

The City has been experimenting with variations of bicycle paths with very mixed reviews. I want to take the time to engage more people in the conversation... before committing to specific forms of bike lanes, and mandated benchmarks.

Press

Articles about the candidate

The Harvard Crimson Paul Toner (Profile)

Well, I think the city can and should, where it can, buy properties that are undeveloped. Either from private owners or take land through eminent domain if it’s sitting unused.

Nov. 1, 2017 — Grace A. Greason
The Harvard Crimson Paul Toner (Profile)

Well, I think the city can and should, where it can, buy properties that are undeveloped. Either from private owners or take land through eminent domain if it’s sitting unused.

Nov. 1, 2017 — Grace A. Greason
The Harvard Crimson Paul Toner (Profile)

Well, I think the city can and should, where it can, buy properties that are undeveloped. Either from private owners or take land through eminent domain if it’s sitting unused.

Nov. 1, 2017 — Grace A. Greason
The Harvard Crimson Paul Toner (Profile)

Well, I think the city can and should, where it can, buy properties that are undeveloped. Either from private owners or take land through eminent domain if it’s sitting unused.

Nov. 1, 2017 — Grace A. Greason
Wicked Local Cambridge GUEST COLUMN: Working to keep city’s values, economy strong

I will fight to maintain our vibrant neighborhoods. Cambridge’s assets are its neighborhoods, small businesses and strong sense of community. I will advocate for policies and infrastructure investments that balance the need to maintain livable neighborhoods, improve our quality of life and create sustainable economic growth.

Oct. 17, 2017 — Paul Toner
Wicked Local Cambridge GUEST COLUMN: Working to keep city’s values, economy strong

I will fight to maintain our vibrant neighborhoods. Cambridge’s assets are its neighborhoods, small businesses and strong sense of community. I will advocate for policies and infrastructure investments that balance the need to maintain livable neighborhoods, improve our quality of life and create sustainable economic growth.

Oct. 17, 2017 — Paul Toner
Scout Cambridge City Council Candidate Profiles, Group 2 of 5

What would your top three priorities be if elected?

My top priority is bringing civil discourse back to local government. I am a very solutions-oriented person and have worked hard at developing collaborative relationships in all of the work I do.

Oct. 5, 2017 — Reena Karasin
Scout Cambridge City Council Candidate Profiles, Group 2 of 5

What would your top three priorities be if elected?

My top priority is bringing civil discourse back to local government. I am a very solutions-oriented person and have worked hard at developing collaborative relationships in all of the work I do.

Oct. 5, 2017 — Reena Karasin
Cambridge Day Surprising many, district public schools will switch to controversial PARCC test

In public comments, Paul Toner – a Cambridge parent, member of the state Board of Education, and former president of the Massachusetts Teachers Association – agreed. “I want my son in fifth grade to have the chance try these new assessments as soon as possible so that he and all CPS students are better prepared for the new test in 2017,” he said, also putting heavy weight on the attractiveness of being “held harmless.”

But several teachers took exception to the term, with Preval saying after Toner’s remarks that she found harm in a new, problematic test “setting our kids up for failure.” Graham & Parks School literacy coach Kathy Greeley said teachers were not opposed to assessments, but harm came to schools through “narrowing our curriculum so that students are spending less and less time in a creative, imaginative way.”

Dec. 18, 2015 — Jean Cummings
Cambridge Day Surprising many, district public schools will switch to controversial PARCC test

In public comments, Paul Toner – a Cambridge parent, member of the state Board of Education, and former president of the Massachusetts Teachers Association – agreed. “I want my son in fifth grade to have the chance try these new assessments as soon as possible so that he and all CPS students are better prepared for the new test in 2017,” he said, also putting heavy weight on the attractiveness of being “held harmless.”

But several teachers took exception to the term, with Preval saying after Toner’s remarks that she found harm in a new, problematic test “setting our kids up for failure.” Graham & Parks School literacy coach Kathy Greeley said teachers were not opposed to assessments, but harm came to schools through “narrowing our curriculum so that students are spending less and less time in a creative, imaginative way.”

Dec. 18, 2015 — Jean Cummings
The Boston Globe New teachers union chief is unapologetically adversarial

The 57-year-old former psychologist turned teacher won her race by openly criticizing the current union president, Paul Toner, for his record of negotiating with — rather than fighting — officials on the development of teacher assessments and the Common Core, a set of national education standards adopted in Massachusetts and 43 other states.

Her agenda forcefully rejects those policies, which have gained increasing support from Republicans and Democratsover the last 20 years. She supports a three-year moratorium on standardized testing and teacher assessments and denounces charter schools. Though these initiatives have never been popular with teachers unions, the Massachusetts Teachers Association, under Toner, took a softer line, seeking compromise rather than confrontation.

June 6, 2014 — Michael Levenson
The Boston Globe New teachers union chief is unapologetically adversarial

The 57-year-old former psychologist turned teacher won her race by openly criticizing the current union president, Paul Toner, for his record of negotiating with — rather than fighting — officials on the development of teacher assessments and the Common Core, a set of national education standards adopted in Massachusetts and 43 other states.

Her agenda forcefully rejects those policies, which have gained increasing support from Republicans and Democratsover the last 20 years. She supports a three-year moratorium on standardized testing and teacher assessments and denounces charter schools. Though these initiatives have never been popular with teachers unions, the Massachusetts Teachers Association, under Toner, took a softer line, seeking compromise rather than confrontation.

June 6, 2014 — Michael Levenson
Cambridge Day MTA elects Cambridge teacher president

Toner taught social studies and reading to seventh- and eighth-grade students at the Harrington Elementary School in Cambridge from 1993 to 2001, when he was elected president of the 1,100-member Cambridge Teachers Association. In 2006, he was elected vice president of MTA.

A graduate of Boston University and the University of Massachusetts at Boston, Toner also holds a law degree from Suffolk University. He lives in Cambridge with his wife, Susan Connelly, and their school-age children, Grace and Jack.

May 8, 2010 — Robert Travers
Cambridge Day MTA elects Cambridge teacher president

Toner taught social studies and reading to seventh- and eighth-grade students at the Harrington Elementary School in Cambridge from 1993 to 2001, when he was elected president of the 1,100-member Cambridge Teachers Association. In 2006, he was elected vice president of MTA.

A graduate of Boston University and the University of Massachusetts at Boston, Toner also holds a law degree from Suffolk University. He lives in Cambridge with his wife, Susan Connelly, and their school-age children, Grace and Jack.

May 8, 2010 — Robert Travers

Campaign finance

How much the candidate has raised and spent

$157
Current balance
$4,050
Balance at the start of 2019
$0
Raised in 2019
$3,893
Spent in 2019